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Committee to End Homelessness in King County

401 5th Avenue
Suite 500
Seattle, WA 98104

206-263-9058
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  • Addressing Homelessness

    Addressing homelessness

    Addressing homelessness is important because it is a bellwether for our society. It tells us if our education system is working, our criminal justice system is working, our physical and mental health systems are working, and whether we are providing our community members the support and opportunities they need.

    Stephen V. Sundborg, S.J.
    President, Seattle University
    Member of CEH Governing Board

    The Committee to End Homelessness (CEH) is a broad coalition of government, business, faith communities, nonprofits, and homeless advocates working together to implement the Ten-Year Plan to End Homelessness in King County.

  • CEH Annual Report

    2013 CEH Annual Report

    The Committee to End Homelessness' 2013 Annual Report establishes our community-driven vision to make the experience of homelessness in King County a rare, brief, and one-time occurrence. The report highlights our strategic approach for each of these outcomes and the collective action taking place across the county to reach our goal. Download the report here.

  • One Home Campaign

    One Home Campaign

    At any given time, roughly 1,000 people in King County have what they need to put homelessness firmly behind them — a rental housing voucher — but they can't find a place to use it in King County's competitive rental market. These 1,000 renters need housing, and we have incentives, protections and services that are available to landlords today, at no cost.

    Learn about these incentives through the One Home campaign, a partnership between government, nonprofits, philanthropy, and property owners.

  • 2015 Legislative Priorities

    2015 Legislative Priorities

    With the 2015 Washington State Legislative Session fast approaching, CEH has identified several pieces of legislation that can help make homelessness rare, brief, and one-time in King County. Read a full list of CEH endorsed legislative priorities.

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Read May's newsletter.

Read May's calendar.

One Night Count Final Tally Shows Decline in Unsheltered Veterans and Chronically Homeless

The final tally from the One Night Count in January shows a notable reduction in the number of homeless veterans and people with chronic homelessness. Compared to 2014, the number of veterans without shelter decreased by nearly 15 percent, and the number of chronically homeless people without shelter declined by over 30 percent. Overall, the point-in-time count found a total of 10,047 people homeless on January 23, 2015, up 8 percent over 2014, including 3,772 who were unsheltered and 6,275 who were living in shelter or temporary housing. The unsheltered count of 3,772 was a 21 percent increase from the 2014 unsheltered count of 3,123. See the full report here and read the press release here.

CEH Draft Strategic Plan

In 2005, our community, along with every county in Washington and most major cities across the country, set the ambitious goal of ending homelessness in ten years. Homelessness remains a crisis here in King County, and we must act urgently and strategically. CEH drafted a new strategic plan to pivot from our past work.

Update 4/15/15: Read the final draft strategic plan here.

Changes in 2015 CEH Committee Meeting Schedule

Please note that the April Governing Board has been moved to June 30 to the Georgetown Campus of South Seattle Community College (6737 Corson Ave S, Seattle, WA). The Governing Board will be immediately followed by our Annual Conference from 10:30am to noon at the same location. For more information, refer to the full list of 2015 CEH meetings.

One Night Count Reveals 3,772 Unsheltered in King County on a Single Night

On January 23, from 2am to 5am, nearly one thousand volunteers across King County counted the men, women and children who are unsheltered on a single night in our community. They reported 3,772 people had no shelter in King County last night, a 21% increase over those found without shelter last year. During the 2014 Count, volunteers found 3,123 people surviving outside without shelter. Currently, King County emergency shelters and transitional housing can hold over 6,000 individuals each night.

Organized by the Seattle/King County Coalition on Homelessness, the count found people in sleeping in doorways, beneath overpasses, in their vehicles, in alleys, or walking around, in the communities of Auburn, Bellevue, Bothell, Burien, Des Moines, Federal Way, Kent, Kenmore, Kirkland, Redmond, Renton, Seattle, Shoreline, Skyway, Vashon Island, White Center and Woodinville.

Additionally, yesterday afternoon CEH coordinated with providers, community partners, and the United Way of King County to conduct "Count Us In", an annual effort to count youth and young adults aged 12-25 who are unstably housed or homeless. Count Us In builds better understanding about this unique population by including a survey, conducted by service providers, to examine the nature and extent of homelessness among youth and young adults in King County. Complete Count Us In results will be released soon.

While the number of unsheltered individuals continues to grow in our community, recent successes in cities such as Salt Lake City and New Orleans show that we also know which interventions and investments can have a lasting impact in making homelessness rare, brief, and one-time in King County.

In 2015, we are also zeroing in on ending veteran homelessness, expanding shelter in Seattle and other parts of the county, adding new permanent supportive housing, and increasing funding for rent assistance and job training. We must also continue to recognize and combat the effect that current state policy has in creating homelessness by supporting increased affordable housing, mental health services, renter protections, and supports for youth and families experiencing homelessness.

Learn more about how this year's One Night Count and Count Us In fit in the context of regional data and efforts to end homelessness in our community.

Read a summary of the 2015 One Night Count.

Thank you to everyone who participated in these vital events to raise awareness about our homeless neighbors.

2014-2015 Winter and Severe Weather Shelters List

2-1-1 Crisis Clinic created a printable list of all the winter shelters and severe weather shelters in King County for the 2014-2015 winter season. The list will be continually updated throughout the season. Be sure to return to this page periodically for updates, especially if you're going to print it out (and please destroy all old printed versions). The current list is here:

One Home Campaign

At any given time, roughly 1,000 people in King County have what they need to put homelessness firmly behind them — a rental housing voucher — but they can't find a place to use it in King County's competitive rental market. These 1,000 renters need housing, and we have incentives, protections and services that are available to landlords today, at no cost.

Learn about these incentives through the One Home campaign, a partnership between government, nonprofits, philanthropy, and property owners.

Coordinated Entry and Assessment Community Forum

In 2012, King County launched Family Housing Connection (FHC), a coordinated entry assessment and referral process for families experiencing homelessness in King County. Over the past two and a half years, learnings from local experience and changes in expectations at the Federal and State level have influenced a number of policy and practice shifts. Consulting firm Focus Strategies has been engaged by the Committee to End Homelessness (CEH) to assess the progress to date and recommend refinements to the system as needed.

At the community meeting on November 6th, Katharine Gale of Focus Strategies reviewed the findings from the first phase of the project, presented information on other system models, and facilitated small group conversation with stakeholders to address key changes. You can find her PowerPoint presentation here.

2015 CEH Legislative Priorities

With the 2015 Washington State Legislative Session fast approaching, CEH has identified several pieces of legislation that can help make homelessness rare, brief, and one-time in King County. Read descriptions of the three priorities led by CEH at the upcoming session below or read a full list of CEH endorsed legislative priorities.

Continue to Fund the Washington State Housing Trust Fund

Support funding for the Housing Trust Fund (HTF), which is funded within the State Capital Budget, at the highest possible level. The availability of low income and homeless housing, as funded through the HTF, is fundamental to ending homelessness. Provide flexibility for meeting a wide variety of local needs and for leveraging other resources.

Preserve and Strengthen the Housing and Essential Needs (HEN) Program

Preserve, improve and sustain HEN assistance. Hold harmless HEN assistance (funded at $59 million in previous budgets), the Aged, Blind and Disabled (ABD) cash grant program, and SSI Facilitation Services. Improve the program by removing the current restriction on chemical dependency as primary disability; increasing ABD cash grant and/or; allowing ABD recipients to retain their HEN benefit for an extended period of time. (As we enter the 2015 session, Commerce has proposed deep cuts to HEN to respond to State requirements to cut 15% of overall budgets.)

CEH further supports the following legislative priorities which will be led by our partner organizations. Read a full description of each partner-led priority.

Partner led Legislative Priorities:

  • Make Housing Bonds Effective Now
  • Fund the Washington Youth and Families Fund
  • Fund Expansion of Extended Foster Care to Last Cohort (Foster Care to 21)
  • Pass the Homeless Youth Act and Establish the Office of Homeless Youth Programs
  • Create a Medicaid Benefit for Tenant Support Services in Permanent Supportive Housing
  • Fair Tenant Screening Act
  • Support Access to Critical Services – Fund 211 Services
  • Certificate of Restoration
  • Source of Income Restrictions
  • Prohibit Discharge into Homelessness among Mainstream Systems
  • Restore TANF Cuts
  • Support Student's Housing Stability

Single Adult Taskforce Brief on Interim Survival Mechanisms

CEH's Single Adult Taskforce created a brief on Interim Survival Mechanisms in King County, such as tent encampments and car camping. Read their analysis and policy recommendations here.

2013 Annual Report: Making Homelessness Rare, Brief, and One-Time

The Committee to End Homelessness' 2013 Annual Report establishes our community-driven vision to make the experience of homelessness in King County a rare, brief, and one-time occurrence. The report highlights our strategic approach for each of these outcomes and the collective action taking place across the county to reach our goal.

Download: 2013 annual report (PDF)

See past reports here.

CEH Charter Affirmed

On June 27, over 150 community members approved CEH's charter which lays out the structure and responsibilities of CEH. Read the approved charter here.

In the news

Read CEH's Youth and Young Adult plan summary here

New Federal Funding: Federal homeless assistance funds totaling more than $22.7 million have been awarded to the City of Seattle and King County for 2014-2015, making it possible to continue a range of housing and supportive services for individuals and families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. The award supports 70 community-based projects for a total of 2,024 units of housing: 727 units of transitional housing and 1,297 units of permanent housing for homeless people with disabilities. Read more...

One Night Count: 3,117 people in King County had no shelter. Read more...

Mark Putnam named new director of Committee to End Homelessness: Local housing leader will guide regional efforts to end homelessness. Read more...

Count Us In 2014: Youth and Young Adult Count

Count Us In is King County's annual effort to count youth and young adults (YYA) aged 12-25 who are unstably housed or homeless. In January 2014, King County held its fourth annual Count Us In and identified 777 youth and young adults in King County who were homeless or unstably housed on the night of January 22, 2014. For a breakdown of the 2014 Count Us In findings, read the full report here and a one page summary here.

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  Updated: Jan. 23, 2015