Skip to main content Skip main menu and go to secondary menu
Committee to End Homelessness in King County

401 5th Avenue
Suite 500
Seattle, WA 98104

206-263-9085
e-mail us

Sign up to receive your CEH monthly newsletter

Where to find shelter in your area
  • Addressing Homelessness

    Addressing homelessness

    Addressing homelessness is important because it is a bellwether for our society. It tells us if our education system is working, our criminal justice system is working, our physical and mental health systems are working, and whether we are providing our community members the support and opportunities they need.

    Stephen V. Sundborg, S.J.
    President, Seattle University
    Member of CEH Governing Board

    The Committee to End Homelessness (CEH) is a broad coalition of government, business, faith communities, nonprofits, and homeless advocates working together to implement the Ten-Year Plan to End Homelessness in King County.

  • Governing Board co-chairs King County Executive Dow Constantine (left) and Car Toys CEO/President Dan Brettler welcome new CEH Director Mark Putnam (center)

    Mark Putnam named new director of Committee to End Homelessness:

    Local housing leader will guide regional efforts to end homelessness

    Mark Putnam, a leading expert on homeless housing and strategic planning, has been named the new director of the Committee to End Homelessness (CEH) in King County. He begins his position on December 16.
    "Mark brings knowledge, passion and a commitment to ending homelessness that will energize our regional effort at a critical time,” said King County Executive and CEH Governing Board Co-chair Dow Constantine.
    Putnam has extensive experience working with government, philanthropy, providers and people experiencing homelessness to develop and implement effective strategies to move people out of poverty and homelessness through stable housing, health care, education and employment. Learn more.

  • One Night Count


    The annual One Night Count of homeless people in King County was held in the early morning hours of January 24, 2014. A total of 3,117 people were counted in cities and areas of unincorporated King County – on the streets, in vehicles, on buses, and other places not meant for human habitation.

    The Committee to End Homelessness and our partners believe that any number over zero is too high. We will work together to help our neighbors who are without homes and find the long-term solutions that will end homelessness in our community.

    One Night Count news release
    One Night Count and the Committee to End Homelessness

    “One Night Count: Why I Appreciate Being Tired on January 24” David Wertheimer, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation blog on the One Night Count: http://goo.gl/ygvSXo

  • Homeless Housing and Services

    2013 Progress Report—Homeless Housing and Services Fund


    Since 2005, the Washington State Legislature authorized a series of document recording fee surcharges to be used to implement state and local plans to end homelessness. In King County, the surcharge revenue is called the Homeless Housing and Services Fund (HHSF). Annually, HHSF funded projects serve approximately 2,454 households (4,232 individuals.) The HHSF also provides funding for the King County Landlord Liaison Project (LLP), a critical resource for homeless housing programs throughout King County.


    2013 Progress Report on the HHSF Funds

Sign up to receive the CEH Monthly newsletter

In the news

New Federal Funding: Federal homeless assistance funds totaling more than $22.7 million have been awarded to the City of Seattle and King County for 2014-2015, making it possible to continue a range of housing and supportive services for individuals and families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. The award supports 70 community-based projects for a total of 2,024 units of housing: 727 units of transitional housing and 1,297 units of permanent housing for homeless people with disabilities. Read more...

One Night Count: 3,117 people in King County had no shelter. Read more...

Mark Putnam named new director of Committee to End Homelessness: Local housing leader will guide regional efforts to end homelessness. Read more...

2013-2014 Winter and Severe Weather Shelters List

2-1-1 Crisis Clinic created a printable list of all the winter shelters and severe weather shelters in King County for the 2013-2014 winter season. The list will be continually updated throughout the season. Be sure to return to this page periodically for updates, especially if you’re going to print it out (and please destroy all old printed versions). The current list is here:

Count Us In 2014: Youth and Young Adult Count

Count Us In is King County’s annual effort to count youth and young adults (YYA) aged 12-25 who are unstably housed or homeless. In January 2014, King County held its fourth annual Count Us In and identified 777 youth and young adults in King County who were homeless or unstably housed on the night of January 22, 2014. For a breakdown of the 2014 Count Us In findings, read the full report here and a one page summary here.

2013 Progress Report—Homeless Housing and Services Fund

Since 2005, the Washington State Legislature authorized a series of document recording fee surcharges to be used to implement state and local plans to end homelessness. In King County, the surcharge revenue is called the Homeless Housing and Services Fund (HHSF). The HHSF is administered by the King County Department of Community and Human Services (DCHS) under policies adopted by the Metropolitan King County Council; and guidelines and priorities established by the Committee to End Homelessness in King County (CEH).

Annually, HHSF funded projects serve approximately 2,454 households (4,232 individuals.) The HHSF also provides funding for the King County Landlord Liaison Project (LLP), a critical resource for homeless housing programs throughout King County. The LLP reaches out to and works closely with private landlords to reduce screening and other barriers for homeless clients, who would otherwise be unable to access such housing. Since becoming operational in 2009, the LLP housed a total of 1,206 households or 2,231 individuals, including those defined as being chronically homeless.

2013 Progress Report on the HHSF Funds

King County Programs Highlighted by United States Interagency Council on Homelessness

Many communities use data from public service systems like jails, homeless services, hospitals, and Medicaid to identify the subset of people experiencing homelessness who are high utilizers of emergency public services. The premise behind these approaches is that priority for housing should be given to individuals who are caught in a revolving door of crisis and who also drive up public costs as a result. While some communities use a simple cross-match of data between HMIS and health care or corrections data, other communities use more sophisticated predictive algorithms that help to select individuals who are expected to continue their pattern of high utilization. Examples of these approaches include: King County (WA)'s Client Care Coordination High Utilizer Database Project, the Economic Roundtable's 10th Decile Triage Tool, and the Corporation for Supportive Housing's Frequent User Systems Engagement project.

Read March’s newsletter here

Read March’s calendar here

Training Opportunities:

  • There are no training opportunities at this time. Please subscribe to our newsletter for information on upcoming training opportunities.

Funding and RFP’s:

  • There are no RFPs at this time. Please subscribe to our newsletter for information on upcoming RFP opportunities.
  To top
  Updated: April 17, 2014